Why I enjoyed Nice more than I thought I would – Part 2 Highlights and Must-Dos

The Stats

We were in Nice for five nights and four days, travelling on BA from Gatwick.We stayed in the port area via AirBnB – for more details, see Part 1 It’s completely impossible to park in the tourist area of Nice, so we didn’t even try to hire a car. Instead, we did a lot of walking, used public transport, which is plentiful and cheap if a bit bumpy, and had one memorable Uber ride. We also did a cycle tour which I cannot recommend enough if you want to escape the bustle for a while. What’s more, you’ll get a guided tour, and a workout thrown in for free.

The Highlights

1. The Old Town

Exploring the streets of the old town (La Vieille Ville) on the first day, buying fresh fish and vegetables from the market for our dinner, and sitting listening to a great clarinettist serenading on the street as we sipped our coffee crème.

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Place Pierre Gautier

2. The Hill

Climbing the hill between the port and the old town and finding a Jewish cemetery, castle ruins, a lookout point over the town, and a whole hidden park perched on the top of the hill.

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View of the rooftops of the Old Town (La Vieille Ville) from the hill

3. The Garden

11 acres of garden at Villa Ephrussi de Rothschild on Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, with its main parterre laid out like a ship: the gardeners were made to wear sailor’s uniforms and hats with red pom-poms to remind the owner, Beatrice, of her extensive travels. Allegedly.

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View of the main parterre, or French garden, designed to look like the deck of an ocean liner (ship).

Different themed gardens included Japanese, arid, water – complete with musical fountains – a rose garden, and my favourite, a Provencal hillside rich with scent: lavender, rosemary, helichrysum, eucalytpus, and pine, basking in the midday sun.

Part of this trip’s charm was an Uber ride to the garden: a Jaguar XE rolled up outside our modest apartment, complete with squishy leather seats and a driver wearing a dark suit and tie. A small taste of how-the-other-half-live, for sure.

4. The Hillside Village

A trip to the hillside village of , a bit of a tourist trap, but worth a look and a wander. I enjoyed the elevated walk around the outer wall, although Chris felt it a little vertiginous and stayed firmly on the ground.

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The hillside village of Saint Paul de Vence

We also visited the Fondation Maeght just up the road:  set on a wooded hillside, the setting is really quiet and tranquil. The building is in-your-face 1960’s – modern, post-modern, I’m not sure of the correct term, and the art includes works by Miró, Chagall and Giacometti. 

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One of the sculptures at the Fondation Maeght. High art or just plain weird? You decide.

5. The Cycle Tour

Favourite of the holiday has to be the cycle tour we took with Nice Cycle Tours.  We opted for the 4-hour Riviera tour, as we couldn’t get onto the city tour early enough in the holiday. I am not a keen cyclist and the idea of four straight hours on a bike did fill me with a certain anxious tension (terror). I need not have worried. The bikes were e-bikes, which ride like a bike, with gears, but also have a battery-powered electric motor which kicks in with an assist as you pedal. It makes so much difference. I managed the four hours without any trouble, and it was such a blast!

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The start of the e-Riviera Bike tour, using e-bikes assisted with electric motors

Jenny, our guide, was from Brighton which was great, as she gave us lots of interesting info in English along the way. We rode out of the port and up into the ridge of hills which separates Nice from neighbouring picture-postcard town of Villefranche. After negotiating traffic, bollards and men with large packing crates full of water bottles (I only nearly fell off once), we found ourselves away from noise and bustle, amid olive groves and low brush and gorse-type vegetation on a road that no-one uses. All was silent, the air still and warm.

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View from the top of Mount Boron, down into the picturesque town of Villefranche, adjacent ot Nice on the French Riviera. Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat is to the right.

Stunning views, a free-wheel down into Villefranche for a picnic lunch, and then all too soon back to the city.

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The picturesque seaside town of Villefranche

6. The Food!

I had forgotten how good French food really is. We didn’t have a bad meal once, and most were really, really good.

Check out L’Agrume, newly opened I think, from its lack of internet presence, on Place Garibaldi. The square is enormous, surrounded by buildings with trompe d’oeuil masonry detailing. We went here for lunch and as we were in Nice, I just had to try the Salad Niçoise. Made with fresh tuna, it was the best I’ve ever tasted – the orange, carrot and ginger smoothie was pretty amazing too.

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Definitely the best Salad Niçoise I have ever tasted. In Nice, obviously. L’Agrume, Place Garibaldi.

We also tried:

Les Garçons on Rue Rosetti, in the heart of the old town, is literally run solely by garçons of varying ages. Many tables are crammed into a tiny space decorated in industrial chic, walls with painted crumbling brick and graffiti, and large dangly metal lamps. It was warm, noisy, full of people, and the food was tasty, burger juices running down my fingers. I liked it.

Le Cafe des Chineurs, Rue Cassini, on the edge of the gay district, another hipster hangout, with quirky artefacts strewn around the place: sewing machine tables, old ornate metal backed chairs, 20s and 30s paraphernalia, full of shabby chic.

Chez Papa on Rue Bonaparte, one of the busy restaurant streets behind the old town. We were squeezed in at the last moment on a Saturday night, which was much appreciated. Chris ordered beef, I ordered tuna, but when it arrived I understood that ‘mi cuit’ means raw in the middle, so we did a swap (he likes sushi) which confused the waiter. Raw tuna notwithstanding, the food was great.

7. The weather

Although not guaranteed at this time of year (late October), we were lucky. Unflagging sunshine, and warm enough to sit outside until it got dark.

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Some fairly spectacular sunsets too.

Up next:

Why I enjoyed Nice more than I thought I would – Part 3 The Internal Journey

See my website www.anniegaphotography.co.uk/nice for more images or contact me for licensing. All words and images ©Annie Green-Armytage. You are welcome to re-blog and link-share on social media with full accreditation; no other reproduction of any kind permitted without written permission.

The Typhoon

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I’m in Hong Kong at the moment and everything has stopped.

This morning we woke up at 6am to a note pushed under our hotel room door: Chris’ work today was cancelled, a typhoon warning, force 8 was in force. Cyclone Hato (it means pigeon in Chinese apparently), which had been making its way westwards from the seas off the east coast of China, was set to make land within 75km of the city. 

hongkong-20170823-DSCF3015A while later the rain started, whooshing horizontally past the window of our 9th floor window. While Chris took himself off to the gym, I made a cup of tea (I can’t go anywhere or do anything without a cup of tea to wake me up), and then sat by the window watching. Or various windows, actually, getting different viewpoints and different angles onto what was literally a force of nature.

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Rain blowing horizontally, palm trees bending and streaming out in the wind, crates, rubbish bins, bits of tree and the occasional street sign blowing like tumbleweed along the street below. As the morning wore on, the storm increased in size and the Hong Kong government website broadcast updates half-hourly, moving the Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal from Storm Signal No. 8, up to Increasing Gale Signal No. 9 and then to Hurricane Signal No. 10.  This is the highest warning signal in existence for Hong Kong. Winds were reported as consistently 175km per hour (108 mph) near the centre.

hongkong-20170823-DSCF2938As I write this, everything is closed, apart from a few brave, or maybe foolhardy, taxis, and of course the hotels. Talking to our breakfast ambassador this morning (yes, that’s a thing) the staff were offered accommodation last night, but she preferred to go home, living within walking distance of the hotel. She walked in this morning in flip-flops and shorts, making some way underground and then dodging bits of rubbish and broken branch along the road to the hotel. Last time this happened, she said, something fell on her. Luckily she had her umbrella up and that saved her from injury or worse.

hongkong-20170823-DSCF2930Having sat, and stood, around photographing raindrops and waving palm trees for more than an hour after breakfast, we decided to brave the walkway to the harbour front, which is only about 5 minutes and covered overhead.

Wow. Exhilarating and a little alarming. Rain came at us sideways along with gusts of wind which had me holding onto the railing, watching polystyrene boxes and tree branches barrelling along below. The water in the harbour was choppy although maybe not as rough as I had expected, but being out in the actual world, experiencing the warm gale and the driving rain was amazing. And we got to use our waterproofs for the first time since we arrived. My packing-for-all-eventualities obsession finally paid off!  Drying off in our little air-conditioned hotel room, I am watching the drama continue out of the window. I was sceptical of visiting Hong Kong during the rainy season, but witnessing nature asserting herself has been memorable.

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